VM Junkie

June 29, 2010

HP Client Virtualization Reference Architectures

Filed under: bladesystem, hp, vdi, view, vmware — ermac318 @ 2:36 pm

One of the great things that came out of HP Tech Forum last week was the official announcement of HP’s various reference designs around their VDI solutions. The hub at HP’s website is here, as of right now only the VMware View architecture PDF is up but the XenDesktop ones are coming (one for XenServer, the other for Hyper-V). Some aspects of this reference design were announced all the way back at VMworld 2009 and are only now coming to fruition. This is mostly because of this bad boy:

HP P4800 BladeSystem SAN

These are the building blocks of the HP P4800 Blade-based SAN solution. HP took their SAN/IQ software and loaded it directly on blade servers, which then attach to external SAS-attached storage to create a 10GBit iSCSI SAN inside the blade chassis. No 10GBit core or switches required! The P4800 is designed specifically for VDI solutions and currently is only available for that kind of solution (although there’s nothing stopping you from using it as a general purpose iSCSI SAN, it’s not recommended because the I/O patterns for VDI and normal server workloads are very different).

This is HP’s flagship VDI design. Going forward there will be more reference designs for smaller deployments, going all the way down to Micro-Branch type deployments with just two servers and no dedicated shared storage but still full redundancy. All are based on the P4000 SAN.

So I’m not trying to make this an advertisement here (although I do think it’s really cool), the reason I’m linking to this is that HP has done a ton of validation and testing around the solution and have provided some great numbers around storage requirements per user for VDI environments. They’ve broken down users into Task, Productivity, and Knowledge workers. According to their numbers, on average these will take 6, 9, and 22 IOPS respectively to support. This can be very demanding on your SAN, and the #1 hardware design related problem users run into is sizing their VDI environments based on capacity and not on performance. These sizing guidelines should help anyone looking to architect a good VDI solution.

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2 Comments

  1. I am looking for benchmark of the P4800. How many VDIs it can serve according to the profiles of users you mentioned?

    Comment by Oded — July 15, 2010 @ 8:23 am

  2. Oded,
    If you look at the whitepaper I linked to they cover how many users they can service.
    Task Workers: 2400
    Productivity Workers: 1600
    Knowledge Workers: ~650

    Comment by ermac318 — July 15, 2010 @ 1:40 pm


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