VM Junkie

January 12, 2009

ESX 3.5 Update 3 now on Microsoft’s SVVP List

Filed under: esx, microsoft, vmware — ermac318 @ 11:33 am

Hot on the heels of the Update 2’s new certified configurations comes Update 3’s inclusion on the MS-approved Virtualization Platform list. Now we’re just waiting on Mike D’s promised ESXi support!

I’m really glad Microsoft finally got its act together and started to provide some kind of support for additional hypervisors other than their own, but something which I wanted to point out to everyone who is saying that the SVVP program is “just as good” as internal Microsoft support:

Additionally, for vendors with whom Microsoft has established a support relationship that covers virtualization solutions, or for vendors who have Server Virtualization Validation Program (SVVP) validated solutions, Microsoft will support server operating systems subject to the Microsoft Support Lifecycle policy for its customers who have support agreements when the operating system runs virtualized on non-Microsoft hardware virtualization software. This support will include coordinating with the vendor to jointly investigate support issues. As part of the investigation, Microsoft may still require the issue to be reproduced independently from the non-Microsoft hardware virtualization software. Where issues are confirmed to be unrelated to the non-Microsoft hardware virtualization software, Microsoft will support its software in a manner that is consistent with support provided when that software is not running together with non-Microsoft hardware virtualization software.

From Support policy for Microsoft software running in non-Microsoft hardware virtualization software, emphasis mine.

That means that should Microsoft so desire, they can still, even if you’re running in an SVVP-approved hypervisor, require you to reproduce your issue on physical hardware. So what was the point of the SVVP program again? Guess it means V2P Migrations if you want to get support from MS!

Update:

Some great follow up from Mike D in the comments, who took issue with what I had said about being forced to run your workload in a physical machine during troubleshooting. If you have a problem, the work flow goes like this:

  • Customer calls MS.
  • MS can’t solve the problem so they call VMware.
  • VMware and MS together can’t solve the problem so you V2P to replicate.
  • Now let’s say someone in MS tech support isn’t trained right or just decides to be anti-competitive (both have happened) and just hangs up on you once they find you’re running VMware. All you have to do is call VMware support (or whoever you get your VMware support through) and they in turn can call MS through the SVVP program. MS can’t hang up on the VMware support team (VMware support won’t let them and they go through a deeper level in the support organization). That’s the recourse. If you get hung up on at MS just call VMware and VMware will bring all of the parties together.

That’s really great info, and I will be definitely getting the word out to customers on how to deal with cranky Microsoft support people! Thanks Mike.

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5 Comments

  1. Yes, Microsoft can still ask to reproduce on physical hardware. However, at that point they have already engaged VMware to assist in troubleshooting the issue and both organizations have failed to fix things. To be honest in my 7 years here at VMware I’ve only ever seen this happen twice and both times the problem still existed without VMware in the picture. Bottom line, don’t be afraid of the V2P clause – it’s just lawyers inserting stuff to CYA.

    Comment by Mike DiPetrillo — January 12, 2009 @ 12:37 pm

  2. Good point, Mike, but at the same time CYA clauses are there for the benefit of Microsoft, not the customer. If MS decides on a whim to screw the customer, the customer has no recourse. It’s V2P or nothing. I’m sure you’ve noticed that Microsoft does not make this same requirement of Hyper-V, which was my point. I think it’s unfair and (lawyers be damned) it undermines the whole point of the SVVP program.

    Comment by ermac318 — January 12, 2009 @ 2:20 pm

  3. Actually, the customer does have recourse. Here’s the flow. Customer calls MS. MS can’t solve the problem so they call VMware. VMware and MS together can’t solve the problem so you V2P to replicate. Now let’s say someone in MS tech support isn’t trained right or just decides to be anti-competitive (both have happened) and just hangs up on you once they find you’re running VMware. All you have to do is call VMware support (or whoever you get your VMware support through) and they in turn can call MS through the SVVP program. MS can’t hang up on the VMware support team (VMware support won’t let them and they go through a deeper level in the support organization). That’s the recourse. If you get hung up on at MS just call VMware and VMware will bring all of the parties together.

    Hope that helps.

    Comment by Mike DiPetrillo — January 12, 2009 @ 2:40 pm

  4. Mike,
    That’s actually great information. Do you know if you or anyone else has posted this workflow? I haven’t seen it spelled out like that anywhere before, and it might make for a good blog post =)

    Comment by ermac318 — January 12, 2009 @ 3:13 pm

  5. Not sure anyone has posted it. I’m heading out to corporate in a week and plan on video taping a lot of different people out there to show VMware behind the scenes. One of the people I’m taping is responsible for doing our SVVP certs. I’ll make sure to put that in the video and then post it on the blog ( http://www.mikedipetrillo.com). Check there in a couple of weeks.

    Comment by Mike DiPetrillo — January 12, 2009 @ 3:27 pm


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